This Holiday Season, Help End the Wait!

E-Kidney Newsletter December 2009

 

This Holiday Season Help End the Wait

This Holiday Season, Give a Gift that Really Counts and Help End the Wait!

Tired of standing in line this season? Then stand tall and think about giving the gift of life—organ donation. More here

 


Kidney HeartKidney Patients' Heart Health is Improving

Treatment of cardiovascular complications has reduced heart-related deaths in kidney patients over the past decade according to a new report, but more still needs to be done.

 


Your Vote Counted...Organ Donor Activist Named GQ Magazine's "Better Man for 2009"

John Piano, founder and CEO of Transplant Connect, wins prestigious award with support of NKF family.

 

Make a Difference This Season--Support NKF

Friends or loved ones who have everything can be hard to shop for, so don't rack your brains seeking the obscure gift item. Instead, honor them with a contribution in their name to the National Kidney Foundation.

 

Shop Online this Season…at the NKF Store

Holiday shopping? With the click of a mouse, you can order great gifts at great prices while supporting NKF. Save 10% at the NKF store by entering "Holiday09" in the promotion code box.

 

Get Creative About Kidneys

Enter NKF's Nationwide Art Contest, open to anyone. You may win a trip for two to Orlando. Click here for details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share These Kidney-friendly Holiday Cookies

These easy-to-prepare pineapple bar cookies are sure to please the kidney patient at your holiday table …and everyone else.

 

 

 


 

 

This Holiday Season, Give a Gift that Really Counts and Help End the Wait!

Tired of standing in line this season? Then stand tall and think about giving the gift of life—organ donation.

This Holiday Season, Help End the Wait

Hurry up and wait. Sound like your holiday season so far? When the line to see Santa snakes down the escalator, when the post office clerk asks you to take a number in the six digits, when your nose turns to ice while waiting all night to buy the latest video game, consider this: more than 100,000 men, women and children are waiting for an organ transplant in the U.S.

This holiday season, help end the wait for those on the transplant list by giving a present that really counts—the gift of life. As part of its Holiday Gift of Life Campaign, the National Kidney Foundation is reminding Americans that for Christmas, Chanukah or Kwanzaa perhaps the greatest gift anyone can give is the promise to help end the wait by signing up to become an organ and tissue donor or by considering living donation.

The National Kidney Foundation is doing its part with its End The Wait! initiative, a comprehensive plan to end the wait for kidney transplants in the U.S.

"The national transplant waiting list hit 100,000 this year for the first time," says John Davis, NKF CEO, "Most of the people on the list will wait too long for an organ and too many will die while waiting. We've decided to meet this challenge head on and lead a broad-based initiative that will increase the pool of living and deceased donors."

Can't stand in line any more? Then stand tall this holiday season and help end the most significant wait of all—the wait for the gift of life.

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Kidney Patients' Heart Health is Improving

Treatment of cardiovascular complications has reduced heart-related deaths in kidney patients over the past decade according to a new report, but more still needs to be done.

Kidney Patients' Heart Health is Improving

People with chronic kidney disease are at much greater risk of developing heart problems than people with healthy kidneys, but new data from the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) shows some major improvements in their heart health.

Increased awareness among doctors that cardiovascular complications can be treated—and even prevented—in kidney patients has helped make this progress possible, says Bryan Becker, MD, National Kidney Foundation President.

"It's a big step forward that death from cardiovascular disease is now recognized not only as a major problem but also that we can do something about it," Dr. Becker says. "And yet more attention is still necessary since the death rate from cardiovascular disease for kidney patients still far exceeds the death rate from cardiovascular disease for people who are the same age in the general population."

The new figures, from the USRDS's 2009 Annual Data Report, cover the decade between 1997 and 2007. Over that decade, the incidence of congestive heart failure, in which the heart loses the ability to pump the blood efficiently, fell by 17 percent in kidney patients. Kidney patients' likelihood of cardiac arrest—when the heart stops beating—fell 29 percent, while heart attack risk fell 15 percent.

From 1997 to 2007, the report shows, the likelihood of a kidney patient having certain types of cardiovascular treatment increased. The rate of angioplasty, a procedure to open up narrowed arteries in the heart, rose from 12.1 procedures per 1,000 patient years to 14.5 per 1,000 during that time period. Kidney patients were also increasingly likely to receive pacemakers, which are implanted in the chest to restore normal heart rhythm. But the chances of their having open-heart surgery to restore blood flow to the heart actually dropped.

In 2005, the National Kidney Foundation published comprehensive guidelines on evaluating and treating cardiovascular disease in end-stage renal disease patients treated with dialysis or transplant. These guidelines helped boost awareness of how to prevent and treat heart disease in these patients, according to Dr. Becker. "The guidelines also provided a concise body of recommendations that practitioners in any environment, be it a regional rural dialysis facility or a large urban academic health center, could follow," he adds.

But more work needs to be done, especially in tackling heart disease risk factors in the early stages of chronic kidney disease, Dr. Becker says. "We have to be vigilant. It is exciting that we can see a downward trend in the U.S. related to cardiovascular complications and mortality for kidney patients but we have more work to do."

More research is needed, he adds, to understand why certain treatments, such as drugs to lower cholesterol, are less effective on dialysis patients than they are in the general population. It's also important to understand how chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder, a condition in which the body loses the ability to form bone and process minerals normally, influences cardiovascular health, he says.

Patients with chronic kidney disease should ask their doctor about how kidney disease and heart disease are interrelated, Dr. Becker advises. They should also keep their blood pressure under good control, and ask their doctor about when and how to lower their cholesterol.

 

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Your Vote Counted...Organ Donor Activist Named GQ Magazine's "Better Man for 2009"

John Piano, founder and CEO of Transplant Connect, wins prestigious award with support of NKF family.

Organ Donor Activist Named GQ Magazine's "Better Man for 2009"

It took a four-month long search and thousands of votes to identify GQ Magazine's "Better Man for 2009." With the help of the National Kidney Foundation and its constituents, John Piano, founder and CEO of Transplant Connect, was selected for the award and recognized as an "agent of change striving for the betterment of society through charitable work, volunteerism and community involvement." Readers nominated individuals actively working to make the world a better place and magazine editors selected the five best submissions as finalists.

Six years ago, Piano left successful careers as a corporate attorney and media executive to create Transplant Connect which provides web-based, real-time electronic medical records software for the organ, tissue and eye transplant field. Replacing inefficient paper and phone-based steps, Transplant Connect's platform reduces errors and expedites the availability of organs, tissue and corneas for transplantation across the United States.

Today, nearly 50 percent of all U.S. organ transplants - some 12,000 to 14,000 per year - are enabled by the company's software platform. The impact is that many more lives can now be saved and improved than in previous years.

Along the way, Piano has become a tireless public advocate for organ, tissue and eye donation.

"There's a severe shortage of organs for transplant, with 18 Americans on the transplant wait list dying every day," said Piano. "Many others are in need of cornea and tissue transplants. If I can help make a difference by raising awareness for organ, tissue and eye donation, I'll do everything I can."

In the weeks leading up to the final tally, NKF's members, staff, volunteers, friends and e-Kidney readers voted to support Piano in his efforts to streamline the organ donor process and spread the message to millions across the country. On his end, Piano pledged to donate the $10,000 charitable contribution that comes with the award to the National Kidney Foundation in recognition of its continued support for organ donation.

It was a win-win situation for Piano, for NKF and, most importantly, for people in need of organ, eye and tissue transplants. Click for more on organ donation and NKF's End the Wait! initiative .

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Share These Kidney-friendly Holiday Cookies

These easy-to-prepare pineapple bar cookies are sure to please the kidney patient at your holiday table …and everyone else.

 

 

Pineapple Bar Cookies

16 servings

Dough
1 cup AP Flour, sifted before measured
1/2 cup butter, at room temperature
¼ cup powdered sugar
Mix the ingredients into a dough and press into an 8 x 8 inch pan. Bake at 350 F for 20 minutes.

Topping
1, 20 oz can crush pineapple in pineapple juice
2 eggs, beaten
10 individual Stevia packets
While the dough is baking, mix together the topping. Pour the topping evenly over the top of the dough and bake another 20 minutes at 350 F. Let cool and cut into 1 x 1 inch squares.

Analysis
Calories 122, total fat 6.5 g, saturated fat 3.9 g, monounsaturated fat 1.7 g, polyunsaturated fat 0.3 g, cholesterol 41.7 mg, calcium 11.2 mg, sodium 50.2 mg, phosphorus 24.2 mg, potassium 61.7 mg, total carbohydrates 15.1 g, dietary fiber 0.5 g, sugar 7 g, protein 1.8 g

This recipe was submitted by CKD patient Chef Duane Sunwold.

Get more kidney-friendly recipes in the Kidney Kitchen.